Beyond The Morphogenesis Art Bag Collection by Julia Daviy

Beyond The Morphogenesis Art Bag Collection by Julia Daviy

In 1952, shortly before his death, mathematician Alan Turing turned his attentions to an important question in theoretical biology: how does complexity arise from homogeneity? How, in other words, does a mass of nondifferentiated cells such as blastocytes or the cells found in a seed, produce the extraordinarily diverse range of cells and tissues that combine to form a lizard, or an oak tree, or a human being?


Turing was already famous for his pioneering work in computer science, and for leading the Allied effort to break the Enigma code during World War II. His speculations on what he termed morphogenesis were grounded in his previous work on the identification and evolution of patterns, and it took biologists more than 60 years to fully confirm his theories.


That confirmation opened the door to applications of morphogenesis in fields ranging from engineering to organ transplantation. And…fashion?

More on Morphogenesis

Turing’s answer came by way of chemistry. When chemicals are introduced to a mass of identical cells—those in an embryo, for example—they react both with each other and with the cells they encounter. These reactions cause the chemicals to interact differently with each cell they encounter as they diffuse across the entire mass, and the progress of these interactions can be described by patterns.
Turing predicted that this reaction-diffusion method would produce six distinct patterns, which form a sort of alphabet for future differentiation. He might not have predicted that it would be used to create a distinguished line of luxury handbags.

Morphocouture?

Turing proposed a theoretical model for general cellular differentiation. But the reaction-diffusion model can be inflected to create differentiation within a specific scope. For example, Turing’s basic question can be narrowed to one of visual texture: how do complex visual patterns arise from nothing? How do stripes, dots, whorls, and other patterns emerge from groups of identical cells found in embryos and nascent seeds?
3D printing, especially when performed as part of an additive manufacturing process, provides a fascinating opportunity to pursue a focused expression of morphogenesis.
The filaments used in 3D printing are of course homogenous down to their cellular structure. And the process already relies on chemistry: the heat sources used to shape 3D objects act as excitatory factors encouraging chemical reactions that produce solid objects from thin strands of fiber. When additional inputs are added to the equation, additional chemical reactions occur which, when diffused across the printing medium, produce interesting, often intricate patterns.

The result is an entirely new species of textile, one whose visual texture arises organically from the same processes responsible for the panoply of nature. The Morphogenesis line of sustainable bags represents the first couture items produced using this approach. It promises not to be the last.

Photos of Julia Daviy Bags made at the New York Fashion Week Flying Solo Ones to Watch Show.

Is SLA 3D Printing Future of Fashion Industry?

Is SLA 3D Printing  Future of Fashion Industry?

Designers, visionaries, and entrepreneurs are spearheading the movement that will result in some of the most innovative clothing and accessories to show up on runways (and eventually your home) in decades. Though there are still current limitations to how stereolithography (SLA) 3D printing can be used in the fashion industry — it’s safe to say that we are at the brink of a revolution.
SLA 3D printing is different than much of the the 3D printing already being put to use in the fashion industry. There are, in fact, three forms of 3D printing being used: Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), Selective laser sintering (SLS), and SLA.   I love FDM for its potential to achieve zero-waste, but hate the imperfection of the 3D printing process faced when using it. An alternative that achieves higher quality “impossible” 3D pieces is SLS technology. However, it’s very resource-intensive and dirty.     This leaves SLA 3D printing, which allows a designer to achieve the highest of quality with zero waste, as the clear future system for the fashion industry, especially because it also requires less human supervision. However, because the technology is relatively new, few fashion designers have put in the effort to understand its capabilities.   At the 3D Printing Clothing Lab and Studio I run with my partner, we use large-format industrial SLA 3D printers as part of the first 3D printed clothing manufacturing model in the United States — if not the world. It was in this lab that I created a dress for New York Fashion Week 2018 with a base made from with the ahimsa silk organza fabric and a 3D pattern in flexible resin.
Though I am well-versed in all three forms of 3D printing, I find myself drawn to SLA technology, often experimenting with it. Not only exploring the potential of SLA 3D printing itself but imagining and creating prototypes of an ideal SLA 3D printer for clothing and accessories production.   Though fashion designers are already elbows deep in exploring the potential of SLA 3D printing, it’s not quite economical — yet.

Electric Potential

Today, 3D printed clothes have the same meaning for the fashion industry as Telsa had for the automobile market five years ago.   Basically, we are establishing a trend and laying the foundation for a new market. But it’s exactly the same as how electric cars couldn’t compete in the market with traditional models: because there was no established production of cheap and reliable components. Only now, with Telsa releasing its Model 3 with an affordable base price of $35,000, does the company have a vehicle that is profitable to manufacture.   Unfortunately, there is a great amount of confusion and misinformation out there with regards to where 3D printing really stands with regards to being able to be used in production for the fashion industry.   At this point, the primary thing holding back the fashion industry with regards to fully embracing the potential of SLA 3D printing is decision-makers inertial, old-fashioned way of thinking about the industry.   For some reason, many fail to recognize that the technology has gotten to the point that it’s scalable. It doesn’t have to be used solely for creating single pieces of art. One case in point is Adidas teaming up with Silicon-valley based Carbon in their Futurecraft 4D series.   For these shoes, running data from athletes are mapped out to establish optimal cushioning and support in the midsole. A design based on this information is then printed using Carbon’s Continuous Liquid Interface Production (CLIP) enabled DLS technology in a UV-curable resin and polyurethane mixture. SLA 3D printing is at the heart of the DLS technology that makes these highly responsive shoes possible.   Carbon printed 100,000 midsoles for sneakers last year and plans to achieve a million items in 2019-2020.   In fact both Adidas and Under Armour have promised a future where customers can 3D print their sneakers in-store might not be high fashion, it’s certainly an aggressive step forward in the way of using 3D printers for fashion on a commercial level.   The other artificial hurdle raised when the powers at be try to stifle the progress of the fashion industry with their old ways is the claim that 3D printing is too expensive to compete in the market place.   Sure, it’s not cheap when compared to mass-market bulk items coming out of sweatshops of developing nations. These sort of garments created in the fast-fashion world, which has already killed the American clothing industry in terms of tastes for quality design and innovation, fuel the unethical system of production that relies on the exploitation of women and children in far-off countries. However, if you’re looking at luxury fashion items, 3D printed items hit the mark.   For the same amount you’d pay for a simple Gucci jacket with high-end trimming made the old-fashioned way, you can buy an absolutely unique 3D printed jacket that’s one of the first such garments in the world. This jacket, created in our lab, would also have the high-end trimming, as our seamstresses are some of the best in the US and have experience working for brands such as Chanel and Balenciaga. So, for those willing to spend money on luxury fashion items, SLA 3D printing is able to compete with top brands in terms of price and quality.
   

Limitations of SLA 3D printing

Though SLA 3D printing is the most effortless form of 3D printing and can be used to create otherwise impossible 3D patterns, there are limitations.   One of those limitations is the low printing volume. However, low volume tends to come with the territory when making high-end, luxury items.   Additional drawbacks include wastewater issues, though the inclusion of water recycling technology into SLA 3D printers seems like a real possibility in the not-too-distant future. There is also the issue of the process being potentially unsafe to just leave going in a home where there are kids.   The real limitation at this point in time is there are no ready-to-use solutions in the market place for designers. However, this will certainly change with time.
   

Solutions on the Horizon. 

In March, I was invited as a speaker to take part in the BIG IDEAS for UV+EB Conference that was held in Redondo Beach, California. The large part of the conference was devoted to the breakthrough of SLA 3D printing.   Besides talking about the new age of fashion—3D printing and other cutting-edge fashion technology—I presented our vision of the SLA 3D printing machines that the fashion industry needs.   I returned to my studio and lab not only with a lot of positive feedback on my speech but also with some fresh thoughts and materials to test for SLA 3D printed fashion.   These materials have excellent properties, they could be printed into flexible, durable, and “pleasant by touch” fashion items. That experience and those materials make me sure that the future of 3D printed fashion is much real and arriving much sooner than many industry experts think.   Tell us how you see the industry further evolving in the comment section below.   Text: Julia Daviy Photo: Vita Zamchevska   Any part of these text and photos is a subject of Copyright. Use it for quotation requires a direct link on JuliaDaviy.com